Shakespearean Headcanon

Collection of personal and closely held views about Shakespeare's works and the historic age he lived in

Moving up and over! (4 days)

Shakespearean-headcanon.tumblr.com is off and running! This blog will no longer be active and/or will be deleted after Friday night, so I hope all you lovely people will move with me to my new blog! Thank you!

Good morning!

Got my first hate message this morning, must mean more people are checking out my blog! Too bad it’s the wrong page, as I’m moving everything over to shakespearean-headcanon.tumblr.com! I look forward to seeing you all over there!

Thank you!

Thank you all so much for starting to move over to shakespearean-headcanon.tumblr.com! I would love to be able to delete this blog completely by the end of next week, so please follow me over there for more Shakespeare!

To my lovely and patient followers!

Having recently discovered that I cannot respond to any of your kind messages and submissions under the name of this blog, I have moved everything over to an eerily similar yet independent page! Please follow shakespearean-headcanon.tumblr.com for more personal thoughts on Shakespeare and his work!

Submission #2-Horatio’s Boredom

In my Shakespearean headcanon, Horatio is always bored by Hamlet.  He thinks Hamlet takes all that Puritan stuff they learned in Wittenberg WAY too seriously.  He doesn’t believe that Hamlet has anything inside that ‘passeth show’, and he’s rather tired off all of Hamlet’s Puritanical moralizing.  Horatio’s a strict materialist, and a bit of a hedonist to boot; he does want to ‘drink deep’ ere he departs, and he rather likes fancy trappings and suits of woe; however, he doesn’t want to hurt Hamlet’s feelings.  Horatio feels like he and Hamlet have drifted as of late, and he considers telling Hamlet that there are more things on earth alone than are dreamt of in his ridiculous metaphysics (Ophelia, for example!).  When Hamlet is mortally wounded at the play’s end, Horatio actually contemplates making a crack about how Hamlet’s too too solid flesh wasn’t solid enough.  

Submitted by mayhap.

#11

I believe the symbolism and language in Shakespeare’s play Macbeth is some of the most beautiful in any of his works. Madness and murder are shown as the rod and scepter of Macbeth’s reign, and when his tyranny can no longer be tolerated symbols, words, and blood fly until at last there is no one left of the old order. When interpreted incorrectly, these words, signs, and symbols can have far-reaching consequences, unseen until it is too late.

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#10-‘Twinning’ Part II

I believe the concept of ‘twinning’ in Shakespeare’s plays was drawn from his very own life. After marrying Anne Hathaway, eight years his senior in 1582, Shakespeare himself was graced with a pair of twins named Judith and Hamnet in 1585. Unfortunately, Hamnet was lost to Shakespeare in 1596 when the boy was only eleven, and so the aspect of ‘twins’ within many of his plays, such as The Taming of the Shrew may pay homage to his only son and heir who died all too young.

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#9-‘Twinning’ Part I

I believe the concept of ‘twinning’ in Shakespeare’s plays was drawn from his very own life. After marrying Anne Hathaway, eight years his senior in 1582, Shakespeare himself was graced with a pair of twins named Judith and Hamnet in 1585. Unfortunately, Hamnet was lost to Shakespeare in 1596 when the boy was only eleven, and so the aspect of ‘twins’ within many of his plays, such as Henry IV Part I may pay homage to his only son and heir who died all too young.

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What are we pondering now?

Do you have any anachronistic idiosyncrasies developed from your love of history? Carry a pocket watch? Have an unhealthy obsession with parasols? eBay and Etsy wish lists filled with historical clothing and costumes? Let me know!